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Posts Tagged ‘Burra Charter’

Revising the Burra Charter: Australia ICOMOS updates its guidelines for conservation practice

This paper outlines the revisions made in 1999 to the Burra Charter, the core doctrine for heritage conservation in Australia that was first adopted by Australia ICOMOS in 1979. It examines the reasons why changes were needed, including broadened perceptions of heritage, new understandings of heritage significance, and recognition of the need for community input into conservation decisions about its heritage. The review process, which took five years, changed its procedures halfway through after members of Australia ICOMOS roundly rejected a draft, while agreeing that a revision should still take place. Following a thorough consultative process with members, the text of the 1999 revision of the Charter was resoundingly endorsed (the text is included here as an Appendix). The paper describes how the revised Charter differs from the previous text. The changes lie primarily in the recognition that heritage value, or significance, may be embodied in the uses, associations and meanings of a place, in addition to its physical fabric. Other key changes include incorporation of a flowchart explaining the conservation planning process; the seeking of community input; and the recognition that interpretation is an integral part of good heritage management practice.
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Issues in Values-Based Management for Indigenous Cultural Heritage in Australia

In Australia, values-based management has formed the basis of heritage practice through the use and evolution of the Australia ICOMOS Charter for Places of Cultural Significance (better known as the Burra Charter). In values-based management systems, heritage planning, decisions, and actions rest on a compre-hensive understanding of the heritage values. Not only does this process re- quire that the articulation of values be the foundation of all policies and decisions; it also implies the need for problem solving to address emerging issues, ruling out approaches based on typological templates. The involvement of all associated communities and stakeholders is essential for success, since this is the means of ensuring that all the values and issues are identified and that they form the basis of management solutions. This paper looks at the history and state of play for values-based management of Indigenous cultural-heritage places from an Australian perspective. It discusses the interactions between Indigenous cultural-heritage practices and the development of the Burra Charter and concludes with a discussion of contemporary issues in this field of heritage work, including rights and intangible heritage issues and the need for integrated considerations of nature and culture.
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Contexts for change: Paving the way to the 1999 Burra Charter

In this paper, I examine the context in which the proposed amendments to the Burra Charter took place and how in fact they reflected trends in heritage practice as it stood when the Burra Charter review started in 1994/95. In doing so, I will outline work within Indigenous heritage to involve community values and its influence on explorations into ‘social value’ for non-Indigenous heritage undertaken by the Australian Heritage Commission (AHC), and parallel initiatives by Australia ICOMOS. I suggest that in fact many threads came together, particularly in the AHC2 over a decade from late 1984.
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