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Posts Tagged ‘Shared heritage’

PhD Scholarship in Critical Heritage Studies and the Belt and Road Initiative

This scholarship at the University of Western Australia is part of a research initiative on the use of history and heritage to advance 21st Century Silk Roads trade and diplomatic ties across Eurasia and the Indian Ocean Region.

Launched in 2013, the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) aims to ‘revive’ the overland and maritime trading routes, commonly known as the Silk Roads, for the 21st century. Driven by a highly ambitious language of regional connectivity, BRI seeks to build infrastructure, energy, foreign policy and people-people ties across Asia, Europe and East Africa.

The scholarship focuses on the cultural components of BRI. There is flexibility in terms of its focus, with possible themes including a critical analysis of ‘shared heritage’, or the intersections between heritage and development or international relations. Candidates with fieldwork experience in Asia are encouraged to apply.

Appropriate research and mentoring support will be provided, with excellent travelling opportunities in Asia and/or the Indian Ocean Region as well as to relevant conferences in Australia and Overseas.

Deadline: 05 April 2019

View more details and apply online

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Reconsidering the interpretation of WWII shared-heritage in Thailand

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to find a different perspective of interpreting a Second World War shared-heritage based on the case in Thailand. Design/methodology/approach – A qualitative study was conducted at the Second World War sites in Thailand. The paper employed observation and interview of the local residents and other stakeholders at the site. Findings – Conventional interpretation of the Second World War sites in Thailand predominantly focusses on two approaches with a little involvement of the local residents. One emphasizes cruelty, loss, torture, or inhumanity with strong influence of the Australian approach. Whether intentionally or unintentionally, such interpretation could point out the culprit and gives audiences enmity against the loser of the war. Another politically underscores a strong connection between Thailand and Japan by presenting romanticized stories of wartime. The paper suggests that the way to bring Second World War shared-heritage site to life is to put an emphasis on the voice of the local residents rather than focussing on political agenda. Practical implications – The argument and recommendation raised in this paper will be particularly useful for the local residents and those who are involved in heritage management field. It would contribute to the better understanding and respect among people with different cultural backgrounds. Originality/value – The paper is the first study of a different view of the interpretation of Second World War shared-heritage. The argument raised in the paper would lead to a wider discussion among heritage professionals.
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Embedding shared heritage: the cultural heritage rights of London’s African ad Asian diaspora communities

Although heritage agencies responsible for the management of world heritage sites are being challenged to incorporate intangible heritage into the nomination, inscription and management systems, there is still very little attention paid in the UK to engaging diaspora and immigrant communities in these processes. The presence of such African and Asian communities in the UK dates back more than 500 years and they form a significant and rising proportion of London’s population. This case study describes a major initiative undertaken by the office of the mayor of London in 2003–2006 that sought to embed the cultural heritage rights of African and Asian diaspora communities into the management of the city’s heritage spaces in a way that aimed to ensure that their heritage is seen as part of the national story. This London case thus provides very valuable lessons for the management of world heritage sites in the UK and Europe.
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